Counting Calories

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In our previous article about Basil Metabolic Rate (BMR)  we explained why it’s so important when making a weight loss plan to first know how many calories your own particular body needs each day simply to provide you with the energy it needs to perform all your daily tasks and functions. This as we have shown varies depending on factors such as age, gender, height and current weight.

In order to lose any weight and more importantly SUSTAIN any weight loss we must consume fewer calories daily than we need according to our BMR (use the BMR calculator found on this page if you haven’t calculated your Basil Metabolic Rate yet).

Determining Your Current Caloric Intake

This is extremely important and a step that is often skipped when trying to lose weight. Often one will just try to start cutting back on the calories in an attempt to shed some pounds without first considering exactly how many calories they actually need to eliminate from their daily intake to achieve the results they desire. In my opinion this lacks focus and doesn’t always work.

Consider this, let’s say an inactive person that weighs 180 lbs is determined to lose weight. This person decides he or she will eliminate a few things from their daily eating habits and cut back on about 500 calories a day. Sounds like a good plan right?

Not necessarily!

Unless this person understands that in the BMR for a person of his weight and activity level is about 2150 calories a day and to lose any weight he must drop below that level 500 calories a day may not be enough. What if he’s already unknowingly consuming 3000 calories. Well cutting back just 500 calories would bring him down to 2500 which means in a months time he would have actually GAINED 3 pounds! (BTW there is a way that his plan could have worked and we’ll go over that later).

Keep a Journal

Determining your daily caloric intake isn’t as difficult as most people initially think. No you don’t have to keep a list of every food on the planet and how many calories they all contain. The easiest way is to simply keep a journal or record of everything you eat for just one week!

That’s right one week. You see for most people 80 – 90 percent of what we eat is the same from week to week. As adults we already know what we like and we tend to stick with it. So for one week don’t even bother trying to keep up with how many calories are in every thing you put in your mouth, just make sure to make of list of what food it was, make sure to keep the days separate so as to be able to determine daily calories later.

At the end of the day or if you choose you  can wait until the end of the week you can use this USDA Nutritional Database to see how many calories each of the foods you consumed contained. I like to print the chart out for quick reference when I do occasionally eat something out of the norm for me.

Using this chart and your journal you can easily determine how many calories you are consuming a day. Are they more than your BMR? If so then you are slowly adding on more weight. Reduce the number below that of your BMR and the pounds WILL drop off. Reduce it to 100 calories below your BMR and you will lose 10 pounds over the next year, 200 below would add up to 20 pounds and so on and so on.

Okay now that we’ve covered the calorie side, remember in our earlier example I showed that our 180 lb inactive person that reduced calories by 500 would still gain weight if he was consuming 3000 calories before cutting back. I said that there IS a way to still make his 500 calorie reduction work towards a weight loss right? The answer is:

Part 4 – Raising Your Basil Metabolic Rate

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