Archive for February, 2011

Flabby Upper Arms? Try Chair Dips

Toning upper arms is one of the quickest and easiest ways to reverse the appearance of aging . One of the best exercises to tighten up those flabby upper arms is the bench dip. Because this series of exercises are for beginners and one of the requirements was to find work out routines that can be done in the comfort of your own home with little or no additional equipment other than what can be found around the house we have substituted using a bench with a simple straight back chair.

Here are the steps:

  • Begin by sitting on the edge of a chair.
  • Lay your hands on the chair next to  your bottom and grab the edge.
  • Feet flat on the floor 2 feet in front of you knees bent.
  • Lift off the chair so you are supported by your arms and hands.
  • Bend elbows, dropping (dipping) your body towards the floor. Dip as far as you feel comfortable.
  • Push back up, squeezing the muscles in the back of the arms.
  • You want to maintain a position with your back as close to the chair as possible to reduce shoulder strain.

Chair Dips

My suggestion is to start out doing as many as you can in one minute. Try to work yourself up to 3 one minute repetitions 3 times a week, you’ll be amazed at the results in a month or so, the triceps respond to resistance training fairly fast.

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Fiber reduces risk of deathHigh Fiber intake reduces death risk by 23 percent.

A scientific analysis of a nine year study conducted by the National Institutes of Health and AARP has found a meaningful link  between high fiber intake and longevity.

The analysis studied the results of over 400,000 people over fifty. The participants between 50 and 71 years old had  fiber intake that ranged from 12.6 to 29.4 grams per day in men and from 10.8 to 25.8 grams per day in women.

The average dietary fiber for most Americans is about 12 grams a day, current US dietary guidelines recommend 28 grams for the average person eating a 2,000 calorie a day diet.  This would suggest that the people in this study of people over 50 with the highest fiber intake are simply in line with the recommendations. The study excluded people with extremely high fiber intake.

Men with the highest fiber intakes had a 23% reduction in the risk of dying while women experienced a 10% reduction when compared to those eating the least amount of fiber.

It’s important to point out that the greatest benefits came from particular sources of fiber, whole grains and beans. While vegetable fiber had a small impact on longevity fruits showed no effect at all.

Fiber is a Natural Anti-Inflammatory

Most researchers believe that the anti-inflammatory effects of eating more fiber is possibly part of the reason for lower numbers  in cardiovascular, respiratory, and infectious disease death.

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Over 50 Beginners Workout Routine – Lunges

lunges

Lunges – Great at Home Exercise for Beginners

The third exercise of this series concentrates once again on the lower body. The lunge involves all the big muscles below the waist – quads, hamstrings and glutes.
This exercise is even easier in some respects than the squat because it copies a very natural, everyday aspect of life. Walking!
Having said that though don’t be fooled. It is a more advanced move than the squat because it not only works and strengthens your lower body but it also will improve your balance.
Okay here’s how they’re done.
From a neutral standing position take a big step forward, keeping your back straight but not rigid and bend your knee to about 90 degrees (make sure your front knee doesn’t go beyond your toes). While steppping forward drop your back knee towards the floor.
That’s it. Really simple and can be done just about anywhere.
I suggest doing as many of these as you can in 30 seconds at first and over time increasing the time intervals to 60 and then 90 seconds.
You can improve our everday mobility and flexibilty by changing this exercise sometimes to stepping either backwards or to the side.

The third exercise of this series concentrates once again on the lower body. The lunge involves all the big muscles below the waist – quads, hamstrings and glutes.
This exercise is even easier in some respects than the squat because it copies a very natural, everyday aspect of life. Walking!
Having said that though don’t be fooled. It is a more advanced move than the squat because it not only works and strengthens your lower body but it also will improve your balance.
Okay here’s how they’re done.
From a neutral standing position take a big step forward, keeping your back straight but not rigid and bend your knee to about 90 degrees (make sure your front knee doesn’t go beyond your toes). While steppping forward drop your back knee towards the floor.
That’s it. Really simple and can be done just about anywhere.
I suggest doing as many of these as you can in 30 seconds at first and over time increasing the time intervals to 60 and then 90 seconds.
You can improve our everday mobility and flexibilty by changing this exercise sometimes to stepping either backwards or to the side.

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